Tag Archives: Deschutes Brewery

Received: Deschutes Fresh Squeezed IPA (12 oz bottles)

Three bottles of Deschutes Brewery‘s newest year-round addition arrived yesterday: Fresh Squeezed IPA. This is arriving on the shelves and on draft year-round starting this month—the first of the brewery’s Bond Street series of beers to do so. This is one tasty beer and a worthy addition to the lineup.

Recently received beers

I hadn’t yet gotten to blogging about these arrivals, with the holidays and more-or-less taking “time off” from the blog, but these two beer packages came recently: The ostensibly-2014 edition of Deschutes Brewery‘s Red Chair Northwest Pale Ale, just-released and tasting awfully fresh. An eight-pack of beer from Portland Brewing, containing two 22-ounce bottles each of MacTarnahan’s Amber Ale, IPA, BlackWatch Cream Porter, and Royal Anne Cherry Stout. I’m looking forward to drinking all of … Continue reading →

Advent Beer Calendar 2013: Day 18: Deschutes Jubelale

For today’s Advent beer we highlight one of my personal favorites: Deschutes Brewery‘s Jubelele. Jubelale is a malty English-style Winter Warmer that was first brewed the year the brewery was founded, in 1988, and was also the first beer ever bottled by Deschutes (that same year). The beer itself is a classic example of the style, 6.7% abv, for which the brewery says: A dark, malty celebration ale with layered flavors and beautifully balanced hopping. … Continue reading →

Received: Deschutes Hop Henge, 2014 edition

Yes, even though it’s still the final month of 2013, I received a bottle of Deschutes Brewery‘s 2014 Hop Henge Experimental IPA: This year’s “monument to hops” is 9.3% abv and 99 IBUs, and brewed with Chinook hops and two as-yet-unnamed experimental hop varieties. I’ll have more to note when I drink it.

Hop Trip and Chasin’ Freshies 2013

After a lengthy study of this year’s onslaught of fresh hops beers (I’ve kept track of over two dozen) I have to conclude that generally this year’s hop crops were milder and less fruity-fragrant than in past years, tending towards earthier aromas. It’s not a bad thing, rather just an observation on the nature of agricultural products and how they can change every year; by and large we’ve been trained not to think in terms … Continue reading →