Tag Archives: Barleywine

Big Beer Week: Anchor Old Foghorn

Let’s start off our Big Beer Week reviews with a classic: Anchor Old Foghorn, the venerable Barleywine from one of America’s oldest craft breweries. Barleywine is one of my favorite styles of beer, and Anchor has been producing their Old Foghorn since 1975—I wrote “classic” above, and to my mind this beer sits in the pantheon of American Barleywines. The current bottling has a strength of 9.4% alcohol by volume (their site gives a range … Continue reading →

Advent Beer Calendar 2009: Day 9: Berkshire Holidale

Today’s pick comes from western Massachusetts’ Berkshire Brewing Company: their rye barleywine, Holidale. This beer is released annually around Thanksgiving and lasts until it’s gone. A rye barleywine, you wonder? Yes indeed; this is from the full label (not pictured): This reddish copper colored Barely Wine Style Ale is brewed with Pale, Crystal, Dark Wheat and Rye malts. Medium bodied and smooth, caramel and spicy rye flavors emerge quickly. Citrus and peppery hop flavors arrive, … Continue reading →

Treblehook Barley Wine

This evening I opened up that bottle of Redhook’s latest Limited Release, Treblehook Barley Wine, their 10.1% alcohol American-style barleywine (as I prefer to spell it), using the snifter glass they also provided in the package. This is a beer that won a Gold medal at the 2008 Great American Beer Festival, and a Silver at this year’s GABF; add that to the fact that the beer is “brewed by hand” and, according to the … Continue reading →

Received: Redhook Treblehook Barleywine

Today I received a package containing Redhook‘s new Treblehook Barleywine (for which I ironically posted the press release this morning), the latest in their Limited Release series (the last was their Tripel). It’s a 10.1% alcohol American-style Barleywine, and the brewer encourages aging it (for up to one to three years), which seems to be a growing trend (Deschutes’ Reserve Series labels this year have a “best after” date of one year after the release). … Continue reading →