Category Archives: Homebrewing

Hop Press: Batch sparge grain bill calculator

Over on Hop Press today, I have an article that is pointing back to this site: I’ve developed an online (Javascript) version of the batch sparge calculations that John Palmer outlines in How to Brew. The actual calculator is here. Last week’s Hop Press article has a bit more backstory.

My first all-grain homebrew

Last weekend (on the 5th, actually), I brewed my first all-grain batch of homebrew, effectively taking my new mash tun setup on a test drive. Overall, I have to say it was fairly successful and ridiculously easy. I brewed a Porter, basing the recipe on a Black Butte Porter clone I found in an old Brew Your Own magazine, and followed the batch sparging technique outlined in John Palmer’s How to Brew (which is a … Continue reading →

The Session #41: Craft Beers Inspired by Homebrewing

This is the first Session where I didn’t have a post ready on the actual day of the Session (otherwise known as “Beer Blogging Friday”), which is a little disappointing (I was on a streak) but in the end I’m going with the words of Charlie Papazian: “Relax. Don’t worry. Have a homebrew.” Appropriately, homebrew is the topic of this month’s Session, as selected by our host, Lug Wrench Brewing Company: Craft Beers Inspired by … Continue reading →

The next Session (#41 in July)

The topic for the July Session has been posted, and is being hosted by the “virtual brewery,” Lug Wrench Brewing Company: Craft Beers Inspired by Homebrewing. How has homebrewing had an affect on the commercial beer we have all come to love?  Feel free to take the topic in any direction your imagination leads you. Write about a beer that has its roots in homebrewing.  Write about a commercial beer that originated from a homebrew. Write about … Continue reading →

Coffee Beer Week: Coffee in homebrewing

When it comes to brewing with coffee, homebrewers have it good: small-scale brewing makes it easy and affordable to experiment in ways that larger commercial brewers can’t. For instance, you could split a batch into two equal parts for secondary fermentation and add two different types of coffee to compare; you won’t need much coffee for this and you only need a second carboy. Of course, getting the coffee into your beer is the trick; … Continue reading →